Formerly Shea Family Chiropractic

What does turning inward really mean? Turning inward is a skill we must learn to tap into our truest selves, to better understand our own wants and desires. Listening to our inner being’s allows us to understand the essence of who we really are. Our inner being knows no limits, and assists us in knowing our true identity. Listening to our inner selves can enable us to love and nurture more, and assist you to develop self-love, self-confidence, clarity, and add harmony to our daily lives.  Truly turning inward isn’t something that comes easy to most. It takes time and energy to understand ourselves, and that’s okay. We have to learn that fulfilling our inner desires is not a selfish trait, it is simply one that is necessary to live a harmonious and joyful life. Selfishness is my biggest fear, so turning inward is something that never came naturally to me. I felt as though others, and productivity had to come before me or I was living selfishly. The truth is I was living selfishly. I was pouring from an empty cup, and I couldn’t give my best to those around me. I had to make a commitment to myself and others that I was going to trust myself and my intuition. I was going to work to fill my cup so I could give to others generously. This was not an easy task. I had to learn to trust that my inner being was always guiding me down the path and the life that I wanted. I had to unlearn the expectations that I had placed on myself and trust that I knew what I was doing.  Connecting with your inner self means staying grounded and always remembering to listen to your intuition. Meditation is my personal favorite way to allow for moments of clarity and peace to come to me. Meditation is a simple way to connect with our inner being and provide a moment of self care by relaxing and grounding our bodies. I challenge you all to work on doing a guided meditation, and take a few minutes a day to reconnect with your inner self and really ask yourselves: What do I want out of today?    -Myriah 

Whether you’re passionate about health, a certain hobby, your profession, or learning new skills - the process of being equipped with insight to problems you first encounter is a vital tool to have as we traverse through life. Here at Aligned Life Chiropractic & Wellness, we challenge our community to be the best and healthiest version of themselves. This outlook on life can be daunting to some due to the seemingly unknown path it takes to reach new heights. As soon as we develop into childhood from babies, human development is centered around one's self purpose. As a child, it is to be an observational learner. This sense of purpose changes as we hit adolescence, where we truly seek a mentor for the passions that create excitement in the adolescent life. When we reach the age of a young adult, our purpose begins to form around what identity we see ourselves as and how the world around us see’s our identity. From adulthood to our last days, our purpose becomes how to continue to contribute to the community we care about and live the best days of being a mentor. Throughout each stage of seeking purpose, we will inevitably run into decisions that will be the driving factor to being successful achieving our purpose. Mentors are there to help in your decision making process to allow you to grow with the foundation of experience from somebody that is a little further along in your goals than you are.  We can look at this like Isaac Newton’s idea of gravity and planetary orbit was far fetched and not accepted during his discovery. Imagine if his studies were never accepted by society and mankind had to continually discover why objects fell. The future Isaac Newton’s would continually be dismissed and our development of knowledge would be stunted. Regarding my personal career, I have always had a direct or indirect mentor that I have learned from. Starting in undergrad, I was lucky to find a mentor to help guide my study habits to the level required for university. He had introduced me to another mentor that was more Aligned with my career. My second mentor had shown me the path he was taking to get into grad school, and I would not have ever applied to the grad school I currently attend without him making me realize I was capable of a graduate program. Now that I